360° VR Panoramas of Pueblo Country, Northern New Mexico
Bosque Redondo Memorial
Fort Sumner, New Mexico


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Grasslands of the Pecos Valley near Fort Sumner

Grasslands of the Pecos Valley near Fort Sumner

The Bosque Redondo Indian Reservation, a million acres, was established here to provide a place to relocate western tribes such as the Apache and Navajo and train them to be modern farmers. The experiment was a disaster.

west of Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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Bosque Redondo Memorial

Bosque Redondo Memorial

The Bosque Redondo Memorial, shaped like a Navajo hogan and an Apache teepee, opened in 2005. There is a trail to the ruins of Fort Sumner and the Pecos River, but the Memorial is (in 2014) still mostly empty.

Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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Mural at the Bosque Redondo Memorial - one

Mural at the Bosque Redondo Memorial - one

In 1863-65 about 500 Mescalero Apache and 8500 Navajo were forced to walk from their homelands to this unfamiliar Indian Reservation on the Pecos River. Hundreds died on the trail, or later of disease. The attempt to establish them as farmers failed and in 1868 General Sherman signed a treaty allowing the Navajo to return to their traditional homeland in the Four Corners area.

Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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Mural at the Bosque Redondo Memorial - two

Mural at the Bosque Redondo Memorial - two

Indians on one side, soldiers on the other, these two remarkable murals of the Long Walk line the hallway leading to the central theater area at Bosque Redondo Memorial. The portraits of soldiers are based on local men, friends of the artist.

Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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The Pecos River at Fort Sumner

The Pecos River at Fort Sumner

The Pecos River may be small but it is of critical importance in this arid country. It nurtured a string of small agricultural communities hundreds of miles long, Before deep well technology it was the only source of irrigation water.

Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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Ruins of Fort Sumner

Ruins of Fort Sumner

Fort Sumner is famous for two things. First, the infamous relocation of Navajo and Mescalero Apache populations in 1862-68. Second, it was in a house that succeeded the fort that Sheriff Pat Garrett shot Billy the Kid in 1881.

Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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Alias Billy the Kid, died here

Alias Billy the Kid, died here

Henry McCarty (his legal name), alias William H. Bonney, alias Billy the Kid. America's favorite juvenile delinquent. Shot by Sheriff Pat Garrett, right here, on July 14, 1881. This is at Fort Sumner, Bosque Redondo Memorial.

Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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Here Lies William H. Bonney Alias Billy the Kid

Here Lies William H. Bonney Alias Billy the Kid

The most remarkable thing about these tombstones is that they have been stolen - twice. Hence the cage.

Fort Sumner, New Mexico

Date photographed: April 9, 2014
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