360° VR Panoramas of the Northern California Coast, Coast Ranges, and Redwood Highway
Bull Creek
Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Bull Creek runs into the South Fork of the Eel River at Dyerville. It was here that the largest tract of old growth redwood forest was acquired for the state park system. Named Rockefeller Forest after the main contributor, it preserves a particularly magnificent section of forest - it is said that there are more trees over 300 feet high here than anywhere else on earth.

Rockefeller Forest lies along Bull Creek. Near the confluence with the Eel River there is a loop trail, then the narrow Mattole Road runs east through towering forest for five miles, paralleled by a trail.

The channel of Bull Creek was choked with rocks and gravel during the 1955 flood, made worse in 1964. Its widened channel, of reduced value for salmon and steelhead spawning, has been undercutting and felling the old trees that the park was set up to protect. Efforts are being made to rebuild it to a more natural width and profile and to restore riparian vegetation.


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The

The "Tall Tree" on Bull Creek

Though not the tallest, even on Bull Creek, this one has the name.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Bridge and fallen redwood on Bull Creek

Bridge and fallen redwood on Bull Creek

A seasonal bridge is placed across Bull Creek in summer to give access to the Giant Tree.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

The

The "Giant Tree" on Bull Creek

The Giant Tree is 363 feet tall and 53 feet around. In 1991 the American Forestry Association, which keeps records of big trees of many species, proclaimed this to be the national champion redwood based on their standard formula.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Redwood across the path at Bull Creek

Redwood across the path at Bull Creek

There are many fallen trees in the Giant Tree grove, including the famous Flatiron tree. Here I am pointing at the growth ring laid down in 1950, the year of my birth.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Childs Prairie above Bull Creek

Childs Prairie above Bull Creek

Childs Prairie is one of several undulating hillside meadows north of Bull Creek.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Childs Prairie Road

Childs Prairie Road

A steep road climbs from Bull Creek to the top of Peavine Ridge.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Rockefeller Forest Loop Trail

Rockefeller Forest Loop Trail

A gentle nature trail through the towering trees in the Rockefeller Forest on Bull Creek.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Gravel load in Bull Creek

Gravel load in Bull Creek

Clearcut logging in the headwaters of Bull Creek released sediment which washed down through the low-lying forests in the floods of 1955 and 1964, choking the stream channels with gravel.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

Bull Creek joins the Eel River

Bull Creek joins the Eel River

Bull Creek, where Rockefeller Forest is located, joins the Eel River here opposite the Federation Grove.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

South Fork Eel River at Bull Creek

South Fork Eel River at Bull Creek

Excessive amounts of sediment in the Eel River are gradually migrating downstream, though it may take centuries for the river channel and vegetation to recover.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

Date photographed: June 16, 2016

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