360° VR Panoramas of Kings Canyon, Sequoia and the Southern Sierra
Crescent Meadow in Giant Forest
Sequoia National Park, California

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Drive-Through Log, Giant Forest

Drive-Through Log, Giant Forest

The Drive-Through Log on the Crescent Meadow Road

Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 18, 2001
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Wildflowers in Crescent Meadow

Wildflowers in Crescent Meadow

Wildflowers in Crescent Meadow

Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 18, 2001
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Log in Crescent Meadow

Log in Crescent Meadow

A Sequoia log that has fallen into Crescent Meadow

Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 18, 2001
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Huckleberry Meadow, Giant Forest

Huckleberry Meadow, Giant Forest

Huckleberry Meadow, near Crescent Meadow

Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 18, 2001
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Log Meadow, Giant Forest

Log Meadow, Giant Forest

Log Meadow, named for Tharp's Log

Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 18, 2001
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Tharps Log in Giant Forest

Tharps Log in Giant Forest

Tharp's Log, a pioneer cabin built into a hollow log

Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 18, 2001
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Sequoia along the Crescent Meadow Trail

Sequoia along the Crescent Meadow Trail

Isolated large Sequoias are found amongst pines and firs on the slopes above Crescent Meadow.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Crescent Meadow Trail

Crescent Meadow Trail

The Crescent Meadow Trail has been relocated well above the fragile meadow. The section leading to Tharp's Log has been paved to provide wheelchair accessibility.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Tharp's Log at Crescent Meadow

Tharp's Log at Crescent Meadow

Hale Tharp lived inside this hollow Sequoia log in the 1870's while running cattle in the meadows of Giant Forest. The log is 75 feet long and naturally fire-hollowed. Several such hollow log cabins are found in other Sequoia groves, including the General Grant Grove.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Inside Tharp's Log

Inside Tharp's Log

This hollow Sequoia log provides a shelter 55 feet long, extended by a small shed at the open end. John Muir visited here in the 1870's and stayed in the log as a guest of Hale Tharp.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Crescent Meadow Trail

Crescent Meadow Trail

Granite boulders and fire-scarred Sequoias.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Fire-scarred Sequoias at Crescent Meadow

Fire-scarred Sequoias at Crescent Meadow

Large fire scars are common on Sequoias, as seen here near Tharps Log on the Crescent Meadow Trail.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Inside the Chimney Tree

Inside the Chimney Tree

The Chimney Tree was hollowed out and killed by fire. Look up.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

The Chimney Tree near Crescent Meadow

The Chimney Tree near Crescent Meadow

Despite being burnt out and killed by fire the Chimney Tree retains some of its bark and remains standing.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Soggy green Crescent Meadow

Soggy green Crescent Meadow

Wet meadows are frequently associated with Sequoia groves. Over thousands of years rot-resistant tree trunks have fallen across the meadows and act as dams to reduce the flow of water, keeping the meadows wet.

Sequoia National Park, California

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

Fallen log across Crescent Meadow

Fallen log across Crescent Meadow

This huge Sequoia log spans the entire width of Crescent Meadow, providing a dry crossing for generations of hikers. The upturned stump and root crown is at the base of the slope on the far end -- look for three people eating lunch in this photo. The topmost branches, long since vanished, would have reached the forest on the near side.

Sequoia National Park,

Date photographed: June 19, 2017

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