360° VR Panoramas of South Texas
Presidio Bahia at Goliad
Texas


Click on a thumbnail image to open an interactive 360° panorama in a new window.
Presidio de la Bahia perimeter wall

Presidio de la Bahia perimeter wall

The defensive wall around the Presidio la Bahia is its most impressive feature

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Fortifications and chapel at Presidio la Bahia

Fortifications and chapel at Presidio la Bahia

Presidio la Bahia near Goliad was begun around 1747 and finished by 1771. It is strongly fortified, the only such Spanish fort between the Mississippi and the Rio Grande. Bastions at each corner are tied together with a high stone wall. All major buildings, including the chapel, are massive stone with small windows. In the Texas War of Independence La Bahia was captured and lost twice by Texian (American) forces, and was the site of the Goliad Massacre.

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

In front of the chapel at Presidio la Bahia

In front of the chapel at Presidio la Bahia

Most of the Spanish missions in Texas had walls and defenses, but the Presidio at Goliad was truly a fortress, with high walls and corner bastions. The chapel was for the use of the commandant and soldiers, the nearby mission served Indians and settlers.

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Inside the Goliad presidio chapel

Inside the Goliad presidio chapel

Inside the chapel at the Presidio la Bahia at Goliad, restored in the 1960's

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Water well at Presidio la Bahia

Water well at Presidio la Bahia

A primary consideration in planning a fortification is to secure a water source safely inside the perimeter walls.

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Bastion on the defensive wall around the Presidio la Bahia

Bastion on the defensive wall around the Presidio la Bahia

A large bastion, with space for five cannons, defends the far corner of the fortification at La Bahia. Despite its strength, Bahia was taken by insurgents twice during the Mexican War of Independence, only to be retaken by Spanish forces, and again by Texian forces at the start of the Texas War of Independence.

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Main gate to the presidio at Goliad

Main gate to the presidio at Goliad

Massive gates in a thick stone wall, flanked by guard rooms, mark the main entrance to the fortress of La Bahia.

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Presidio La Bahia Museum

Presidio La Bahia Museum

In the Texas War of Independence the Presidio of Goliad was captured and held for six months by Colonel James Fannin. The Texas Declaration of Independence was signed here in December of 1835.

Presidio la Bahia, Goliad State Park and Historic Site, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

The Goliad Massacre Memorial

The Goliad Massacre Memorial

During the Texas War of Independence, Texian (American) forces under Colonel James Fannin were captured by the Mexican army in the battle of Coleto. About 300 were sent as prisoners to the strategic Presidio La Bahia at Goliad, where they expected to eventually be released However, General Santa Anna (best known for his capture of the Alamo), and now president of Mexico, ordered the prisoners to be executed. The American captives were taken outside on Palm Sunday, March 27, 1836, and shot. Survivors were clubbed or stabbed to death, and the bodies piled and burnt. Colonel Fannin was killed last, blindfolded and seated in a chair. A total of 342 men were killed and 28 were spared or escaped in what is known as the Goliad Massacre.

Fannin Battleground State Historic Site, near Goliad, Texas

Date photographed: April 4, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Previous locality: Goliad Mission Next locality: Goose Island