360° VR Panoramas of Marin and the North Bay Counties
The West Ridge of Mount Tamalpais
Marin County, California

From the cities of eastern Marin, Mount Tampalpais seems to be a sharp cone, like a volcano. But it is really a long east-west ridge, with three almost equal summits.

The west end of the ridge drops slowly in rounded steps for miles until it plunges to the ocean at Stinson Beach. On a clear day the scenery along Ridgecrest Boulevard (hardly a boulevard, just a two lane road) is breathtaking, a California classic of rounded hills and dramatic drops to the sparkling Pacific.

This is famous country for hikers, runners, and cyclists. The Dipsea Trail drops half a vertical mile from this ridge to the ocean, and cyclists swoop through the series of hillocks and dips known as the Seven Sisters, either on pavement or parallel single-track trails.


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West ridge of Mount Tam

West ridge of Mount Tam

Grassy ridges plunge to the ocean from the west ridge of Mount Tam.

Mount Tamalpais State Park, California

Date photographed: November 7, 2011
See location in Google Maps

Mount Tam west ridge

Mount Tam west ridge

Two thousand feet above the coast on Mount Tam's west side.

Mount Tamalpais State Park, California

Date photographed: November 7, 2011
See location in Google Maps

Seven Sisters ridge on Mount Tam

Seven Sisters ridge on Mount Tam

A series of knolls and hollows on the west ridge of Mount Tam is known to cyclists as the Seven Sisters.

Mount Tamalpais State Park, California

Date photographed: November 7, 2011
See location in Google Maps

Seven Sisters ridge on Mount Tam

Seven Sisters ridge on Mount Tam

The Seven Sisters along Mount Tam's west ridge, well known to cyclists.

Mount Tamalpais State Park, California

Date photographed: November 7, 2011
See location in Google Maps

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