360° VR Panoramas of Northern Arizona
Pipe Spring National Monument
Kaibab Indian Reservation, near Fredonia, Arizona


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Visitor Center at Pipe Spring National Monument

Visitor Center at Pipe Spring National Monument

Behind the visitor center there is small enclosure where native grasses are grown. It is a small attempt to recreate the vast grasslands that once covered the Arizona Strip, destroyed by overgrazing in the nineteenth century.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
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Corrals at Pipe Spring

Corrals at Pipe Spring

Along with the Winsor Castle fortification, the monument includes blacksmith and other workshops, and corrals with horses and cattle. A huge longhorn bull is in the far corral, but he was too shy to come out for a picture.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Winsor Castle at Pipe Spring

Winsor Castle at Pipe Spring

Winsor Castle at Pipe Spring was headquarters for the Mormon tithe herds

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Duck pond at Pipe Spring

Duck pond at Pipe Spring

The precious spring is located directly underneath the castle. From there it runs into these ponds, then to irrigated fields and stock troughs.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
See location in Google Maps

On the parapet at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

On the parapet at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Winsor Castle is a strongly built fortification, but was never attacked. It served as headquarters for the Mormon tithe herds of the Arizona Strip.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
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Childrens room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Childrens room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Large families were (and still are) characteristic of Mormons. Unlike so many frontier outposts that consisted mostly of young men, Pipe Spring was a family place.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
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In the courtyard at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

In the courtyard at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Winsor Castle was built by the Mormon church to protect the water source known as Pipe Spring. This spring was the strategic key to the vast grazing lands of the Arizona strip.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
See location in Google Maps

Kitchen at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Kitchen at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

This kitchen and dining served both the families living at the castle and the farm workers and cowboys. The chairs are turned backwards ready for prayer before meals.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
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Upstairs room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Upstairs room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Nineteenth century furnishings here include a "Mormon bed" that pulls out to change from a couch to a double bed.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
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Cheese room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Cheese room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

This room in the basement of Winsor Castle was used for making large quantities of cheese, 60 to 80 pounds a day.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
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Spring room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Spring room at Winsor Castle, Pipe Spring

Cold pure water from the natural Pipe Spring flowed into the right end of this trough, then exited the left end through the stone wall to the ponds outside. This cool partly underground room was used for curing cheese on the revolving rack.

Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona

Date photographed: April 30, 2014
See location in Google Maps

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